Good Sam RV Travel Guide & Campground Directory

Visiting Nebraska on Your Next Road Trip



The state of Nebraska possesses vast grasslands, Ponderosa pines, quiet prairie streams, rocky bluffs, river valleys, and sandhill buffalo ranges. The "Cornhusker State" greets visitors the way nature intended – with a standing invitation to unforgettable outdoor adventures. It's an ideal destination spot for RVers and campers with lovely Nebraska campgrounds and Nebraska RV camping resorts throughout the state.

In west central Nebraska near Gering, Wildcat Hills State Recreation Area, Nature Center, and Big Game Reserve overlooks the North Platte River Valley. Wildcat Hills’ terrain is a rough-and-ready combination of forested canyons and rocky hillsides. Interestingly, most of the native stone structures at this park were built by the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps. A newer, split-level Nature Center blends nicely into Wildcat’s existing terrain with such unique features as a mock Ponderosa pine extending from ground floor to second-story ceiling. The north wall of the center sports tinted glass panes designed to allow guests to discreetly observe birds munching at window-mounted feeders. There’s also a buzzing, live bee colony and interactive computer displays that focus on local birds and endangered species. Hikers and cross-country skiers enjoy the park’s nature trails and footbridges surrounded by mountain mahogany and cedar trees, yucca plants and wildflowers. At the enclosed, Big Game Reserve, visitors can catch early morning views of bison, elk, bobcats and coyotes. (Prior to arrival, RVers should contact the park office for information about vehicle size restrictions on the summit access road.)

Lake McConaughy, or "Big Mac," and Lake Ogallala State Recreation Areas are headquartered in Ogallala in the Platte River Valley of southwestern Nebraska. "Big Mac" is the state’s primary reservoir, measuring 20 miles long, four miles wide, and 142 feet at its deepest point. Moreover, its 100 miles of shoreline and sandy white beaches provide the perfect setting for waterside recreation. Lake Ogallala, the "little lake," is adjacent to McConaughy. Together, they add up to a tremendous fishing arena. Anglers pull several types of record-breaking bass, walleye, yellow perch and rainbow trout from these clear, chilly waters. Besides first-class fishing, favorite warm weather activities at this park include swimming, boating, sailing, windsurfing, water skiing and scuba diving. Fall brings waterfowl hunters to McConaughy/Ogallala and winter is the serene season for ice skaters, backpackers and ice boaters.

Nebraska National Forest’s Bessey Recreation Area is based near Halsey in the central part of the "Cornhuskers State." As the world’s largest man-made forest, it’s an extraordinary woodland first conceived when botanist Dr. Charles Bessey heard an Indian legend about pine forests growing on Nebraska’s sandhills. Bessey speculated whether such woodlands could make a comeback. And, in 1902, he implemented experimental sandhill tree plantings. His seedlings – red cedars, jack and Ponderosa pines – were the humble beginnings of today‘s Nebraska National Forest. Besides prolific trees, the Bessey Recreation Area provides the Forest Service’s only swimming pool, as well as fishing and hunting options, hiking trails, and tubing fun on the Middle Loup River. Stay nearby - there is a range of Nebraska campgrounds and Nebraska RV camping resorts just around the corner. For a sweeping view of the forest and an insider’s look at the park’s fire detection methods, guests may climb a stairway to the observation deck at Scott Lookout Towers. At the top of the towers, they might also spot forest dwellers like prairie chickens, antelopes and porcupines.

Indian Cave State Park is located in Shubert in Nebraska’s far southeastern Missouri River Valley. "All-natural" is the best way to describe Indian Cave, which was named for a mystifying sandstone cavern containing prehistoric images etched by ancient inhabitants. Hikers, backpackers and horseback riders find a nice selection of trails, as well as plenty of fishing action on the mighty Missouri. Riverbank anglers reel in bullheads, bass and the occasional sturgeon. Dramatic color changes make Indian Cave territory glow in autumn and snow-seeking winter guests find a recreational bonanza – wide open spaces for merry sledding and cross-country skiing.

Article Courtesy of Woodall's Campground Directory where you can find Nebraska campgrounds and Nebraska RV camping resorts at your fingertips. Browse Nebraska Campgrounds